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Both public actors, financial agencies and producers are interested in knowing the success or risk factors to plan the development of fish farming activity in specific areas. Using geographic tools (GIS), the Fish for Life II Project carried out a mapping of climate risks that can be used to prioritize new ventures or consolidate existing ones, as well as to verify their viability in terms of economic and environmental sustainability. .

Both public actors, financial agencies and producers are interested in knowing the success or risk factors to plan the development of fish farming activity in specific areas. Using geographic tools (GIS), the Fish for Life II Project carried out a mapping of climate risks that can be used to prioritize new ventures or consolidate existing ones, as well as to verify their viability in terms of economic and environmental sustainability. .

In recent decades, fish farming in Bolivia was identified as an activity that has the potential to play an important role in rural areas, diversifying livelihoods and improving food security. However, the activity is still, in general, incipient. It is growing in some regions of the country (such as Yapacaní), in others it remains stagnant, suggesting that there are local and/or regional factors that determine its development.

Climatic factors can be decisive. In fact, they are important in fish farming activity by conditioning the availability of water in the ponds and the optimal temperature for the growth of fish. For the study, the prolonged period of drought, flooding, and low water temperature during times of prolonged surazos (cold fronts) that slow growth and/or cause mortality were considered risks.

The map shows that there is no relationship between the climatic risks considered and the number of fish farming ponds per municipality. This suggests that producers do not take into account the climate risk factor in the decision to start in this field.

This leads to two important hypotheses, currently being validated: the climate risk is lower than expected or fish farming is vulnerable to being affected by climate factors.

Contacts:
José Zubieta, FAUNAGUA, pp_zubiet@yahoo.com
Felipe L. Lobo, UVIC, lobo@uvic.ca

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