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The training of human resources is one of the fundamental pillars to improve “good fish farming practices” through mechanisms that allow for certified technicians (men and women) with legitimacy in the eyes of fish farming associations and families. Between December 2015 and May 2016, the Fish for Life II Project began a first cycle of training for 40 auxiliary technicians in fish farming, with participants from the departments of Beni, Cochabamba, Tarija and Santa Cruz.

The training of human resources is one of the fundamental pillars to improve “good fish farming practices” through mechanisms that allow for certified technicians (men and women) with legitimacy in the eyes of fish farming associations and families. Between December 2015 and May 2016, the Fish for Life II Project began a first cycle of training for 40 auxiliary technicians in fish farming, with participants from the departments of Beni, Cochabamba, Tarija and Santa Cruz. According to PPV II studies, the main weaknesses identified in the fish farming activity are human capital (skills and knowledge), the lack of access to technical assistance services and the low level of skills and mechanisms to apply “Good Fish Farming Practices (BPP) ”. These deficiencies significantly affect the levels of productivity, efficiency and profitability of the activity (see bulletin n°2, March 2016, Baseline: the reality of the LINK fish farming sector).

With the purpose of strengthening human capital and creating capacities and new technical skills in fish farmers, Peces para la Vida II has incorporated the training of local human resources specialized in fish farming, who in the medium future can provide effective services to producing families. .
The mechanisms used in the training process have been:

Participant selection

The main fish farming organizations in the Project area and their respective municipalities selected their participants taking into account two criteria: 1) people committed to applying the peer-to-peer technical assistance methodology; 2) consideration of gender equity to promote the participation and balanced access of men and women.

Training certification

Jointly, CEPAC and the Comprehensive Faculty of Ichilo UAGRM/ICAP (Popular Training Institute of the Gabriel René Moreno Autonomous University) drafted and approved the curricular framework for the creation of the “Auxiliary Fish Farming Technician Career”. The curriculum and the content of the subjects have been conceived according to the fish production cycle.

High quality technical support

The course included the participation of expert specialists from Bolivia, as well as experts from Brazil (EMBRAPA) and Argentina (PROTEGER) through South-South cooperation facilitated and financed by WFT (Canada).

Practical training

The course lasted 800 academic hours, of which 184 hours took place in the classroom and 616 were practical.

 

For the first training cycle 2015-2016, a total of 40 students (24 men and 16 women) enrolled, with the majority of them coming from the core area of the Project. 80 % of the participants completed the training process (19 men and 13 women).

In September 2016, the second cycle of the course for auxiliary technicians in fish farming began with approximately 39 new students, both men and women (14 from the Cochabamba Tropics). The six-month training cycle will run until February 2017.

Contacts:
Verónica Hinojosa, CEPAC, vhinojosa@cepac.org.bo
Tiffanie Rainville, WFT, tiffanie@worldfish.org

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